Because every American
should have access
to broadband Internet.

The Internet Innovation Alliance is a broad-based coalition of business and non-profit organizations that aim to ensure every American, regardless of race, income or geography, has access to the critical tool that is broadband Internet. The IIA seeks to promote public policies that support equal opportunity for universal broadband availability and adoption so that everyone, everywhere can seize the benefits of the Internet - from education to health care, employment to community building, civic engagement and beyond.

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Access to Broadband Internet: Top Ten Areas of Saving - 2013

 
 



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METHODOLOGY

In updating the “Top 10 Ways Being Online Saves You Money” report, IIA looked at the top areas of consumer spending and the discounts that are available to Internet users.  Based on the 2012 Consumer Expenditure Survey released by the U.S. Department of Labor, we used online resources and applications to find discounts on essentials like housing, apparel, gasoline and food.  Mobile broadband and apps have changed the way that people shop online, providing access to discounts on everything from leisure activities to groceries. Some areas of this analysis, like housing, gasoline and newspaper expenditures, required data specific to certain cities.  For the purposes of this report, we chose five of the top 12 U.S. cities by population (New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville) also keeping geographic diversity in mind. In a departure from last year’s methodology, we factored in the average annual cost of a mobile data plan ($690) rather than the average annual cost of a home broadband connection. Overall, we found that, after figuring in the cost of a mobile data plan, the savings in this year’s analysis ($8,674) were slightly higher than those in last year’s analysis ($8,170) and the year prior ($7,695).  We looked at comparable products across the board and used similar websites for comparison, along with a number of apps available for tablets and other mobile devices.  The below methodology provides more detail as to the calculations used for each savings category.

ONE. HOUSING. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,850/YR (13.52%)

Source: Search based study on apartments in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Sampled 50 online postings in the above markets to determine average cost savings relative to local apartment rent.  Considered the average annual expenditure on shelter ($16,887) minus the annual mortgage interest and charges for owned homes ($3,200) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.  Applied 13.52% savings factor to the remaining average expenditure for apartment living ($13,687).
Source examples: www.craigslist.org, Craigslist App, www.trulia.com, Trulia Rent App, www.apartments.com , Apts.com App

TWO. AUTOMOTIVE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $500 (A ONETIME SAVINGS OF 1.63%)

Source: Cost analysis based on average new car purchase price in 2012
Methodology: Applied $500 savings factor from Dealership Internet Departments vs. Traditional Car Buying to the average 2012 vehicle purchase cost net outlay ($30,748) based on a report by TrueCar.com.
http://www.autoblog.com/2012/04/11/average-price-of-new-cars-hits-all-time-record/

THREE. TRAVEL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,800/YR (20%)

Source: Amadeus Case Study amadeus.com/us/documents/aco/us/BearingPoint.pdf
Methodology: Applied 20% savings factor from Amadeus study to the average amount spent on travel ($8,998) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.

FOUR. FOOD. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $760/YR (19.38%)

Source: Search based study on basic basket of groceries based on top selling categories (Carbonated beverages, Milk, Fresh bread, Beer, Salty snacks, Natural cheese, Frozen dinners/entrees, Cold cereal, Wine, Cigarettes)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of monthly groceries to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the Internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 19.38% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on food at home ($3,921) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Source example: www.couponmom.com, www.peapod.com, www.coupons.com

FIVE. NON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS. $114/YR (31.94%)

Source: Search based study on common over the counter medicines (Pain Relievers, Antacids, Cold Remedies, Allergy Relief, Natural Remedies)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of the best-selling non-prescription drugs to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the Internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 31.94% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on non-prescription drugs, which was derived as 10% of the average annual expenditure on healthcare ($3,556) from the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Source example: www.drugstore.com, www.amazon.com

SIX. GASOLINE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $142/YR (5.57%)

Source: Search based study on lowest gasoline prices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Researched average gas prices for each of the above cities, and found the lowest advertised prices in each, for a savings of 5.57% off of average gasoline expenditure ($2,549) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Source example: www.gasbuddy.com, GasBuddy App

SEVEN. ENTERTAINMENT. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $2,964/YR (56.11%)

Source: Search based study on restaurant dining, sporting/concert tickets and leisure activities in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Applied savings factor of 56.11% on dining outside of the home ($2,605) and entertainment such as concerts, events and leisure activities to the entertainment budget ($2,678) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Source example: Groupon App, Living Social App, www.bargainseatsonline.com

EIGHT. APPAREL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,100/YR (63.38%)

Source: Search based study on basic clothing combinations for men and women
Methodology:  Created a set of standard baskets of apparel for a man (khakis/jeans and shirts) and a woman (skirts/jeans and tops) to establish a baseline retail cost in each of five price categories.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the Internet.  Applied 63.38% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on apparel ($1,736) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: JackThreads App, Overstock.com – Mobile, Gilt App

NINE. NEWSPAPERS. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $87/YR (37.37%)

Source: Search based study reviewing major newspapers in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Calculated the standard annual rate for a daily delivery (including Sunday) subscription for the top three papers in each of the above cities.  Potential savings factor based on average annual daily subscription rates vs. online subscription rates and access to the newspaper’s app (where available).
Source example: www.nytimes.com, www.chicagotribune.com, www.dallasnews.com 

TEN. BILL PAY. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $47/YR (100%)

Source: Cost analysis based on average consumer’s postage for six bills per month, plus one pay-by-phone charge.
Methodology: Created a standard multiple of monthly bills that are traditionally paid via postage (Rent/Mortgage, Gas, Electric, Water, Cable/Phone/Internet, Mobile). Applied average cost per US postal stamp ($0.44) for each monthly bill, plus the savings of one average pay-by-phone charge ($15).
Site examples: www.mycheckfree.com, www.chase.com, www.bankofamerica.com

 

Posted by admin on 10/28 at 08:46 PM

Access to Broadband Internet: Top Ten Areas of Saving - 2012

 
 

Top Ten Areas of Savings 2012

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METHODOLOGY OVERVIEW

In updating the “Top 10 Ways Being Online Saves You Money” report, IIA looked at the leading areas
of consumer spending and the saving opportunities that are only available to Internet users. Based
on the 2011 Consumer Expenditure Survey released by the U.S. Department of Labor, we calculated
the amount and percentage that can be saved by having and using a high-speed Internet connection
with online resources for finding discounts on essentials like housing, apparel, gasoline and
food. Additionally, we took into account the power of group buying sites like LivingSocial and
Groupon that have changed the way people spend on basics like entertainment and provide tremendous
discounts on leisure activities, restaurants and sporting events. Other online resources like
couponmom.com and gasbuddy.com alert savvy consumers to deals at establishments in their city.
Some areas of this analysis, like housing, gasoline and newspaper expenditures, required data
specific to certain cities.  For the purposes of this report, we chose five of the top 12 U.S.
cities by population (New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville) also keeping
geographic diversity in mind. Overall, we found that the percentage of savings in this year’s
analysis was relatively similar to last year’s research and the year prior. But as pointed out by
the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, average annual expenditures rose 3.3 percent in 2011, causing
a jump in the total dollars saved (in $8,870.01 2012, $7,694.56 in 2011, and $7,707 in 2010) with
consumers spending more in the 10 categories. This rise in spending in 2011 barely outpaced the
3.2-percent increase in prices for goods and services from 2010 to 2011, as measured by the
average annual change in the Consumer Price Index (CPI-U). The below methodology provides more
detail as to the calculations IIA used for each savings category.

ONE. HOUSING. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,736/YR (12.75%)

Source: Search based study on apartments in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Sampled 50 online postings in the above markets to determine average cost savings relative to local apartment rent.  Considered the average annual expenditure on shelter ($16,803) minus the annual mortgage interest and charges for owned homes ($3,184) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.  Applied 12.75% savings factor to the remaining average expenditure for apartment living ($13,619). Site examples: www.apartmentfinder.com, www.apartments.com, www.craigslist.org

TWO. AUTOMOTIVE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $444 (A ONETIME SAVINGS OF 1.5%)

Source:Cost analysis based on average new car purchase price in 2011
Methodology: Applied 1.5% savings factor from JMR study to the average 2011 vehicle purchase cost net outlay ($29,602) based on a report by the New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/21/business/21auto.html?_r=0

THREE. TRAVEL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,659/YR (20%)

Source: Amadeus Case Study amadeus.com/us/documents/aco/us/BearingPoint.pdf
Methodology: Applied 20% savings factor from Amadeus study to the average amount spent on travel ($8,293) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.

FOUR. FOOD. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $994/YR (25.90%)

Source: Search based study on basic basket of groceries based on top selling categories (Carbonated beverages, Milk, Fresh bread, Beer, Salty snacks, Natural cheese, Frozen dinners/entrees, Cold cereal, Wine, Cigarettes)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of monthly groceries to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the Internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 25.9% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on food at home ($3,838) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
    Site example: www.couponmom.com, www.peapod.com, www.coupons.com

FIVE. NON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS. $110/YR (33.25%)

Source: Search based study on common over the counter medicines (Pain Relievers, Antacids, Cold Remedies, Allergy Relief, Natural Remedies)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of the best-selling non-prescription drugs to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the Internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 33.25% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on non-prescription drugs, which was derived as 10% of the average annual expenditure on healthcare ($3,313) from the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.drugstore.com, www.amazon.com

SIX. GASOLINE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $161/YR (6.08%)

Source: Search based study on lowest gasoline prices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Researched average gas prices for each of the above cities, and found the lowest advertised prices in each, for a savings of 6.08% off of average gasoline expenditure ($2,655) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.gasbuddy.com

SEVEN. ENTERTAINMENT. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $2,497/YR (48.10%)

Source: Search based study on restaurant dining, sporting/concert tickets and leisure activities in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Applied savings factor of 48.10% on dining outside of the home ($2,620) and entertainment such as concerts, events and leisure activities to the entertainment budget ($2,572) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.groupon.com, www.livingsocial.com, www.bargainseatsonline.com

EIGHT. APPAREL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,046.78/YR (60.16%)

Source: Search based study on basic clothing combinations for men and women
Methodology: Created a set of standard baskets of apparel for a man (khakis/jeans and shirts) and a woman (skirts/jeans and tops) to establish a baseline retail cost in each of five price categories.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the Internet.  Applied 60.16% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on apparel ($1,740) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.overstock.com, www.jackthreads.com, www.gilt.com

NINE. NEWSPAPERS. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $174.52/YR (84.88%)

Source: Search based study reviewing major newspapers in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Calculated the standard annual rate for a daily delivery (including Sunday) subscription for the top three papers in each of the above cities.  Potential savings factor based on average annual daily subscription rates vs. online subscription rates.
Site example: www.nytimes.com, www.chicagotribune.com, www.dallasnews.com 

TEN. BILL PAY. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $47/YR (100%)

Source: Cost analysis based on average consumer’s postage for six bills per month, plus one pay-by-phone charge.
Methodology: Created a to a standard multiple of monthly bills that are traditionally paid via postage (Rent/Mortgage, Gas, Electric, Water, Cable/Phone/Internet, Mobile). Applied average cost per US postal stamp ($0.44) for each monthly bill, plus the savings of one average pay-by-phone charge ($15).
Site examples: www.mycheckfree.com, www.chase.com, www.bankofamerica.com


 


2011 Cost Savings Report

2010 Cost Savings Report

Posted by admin on 11/15 at 01:48 PM

Start-Up Savings: Top 10 Ways Broadband Saves American Entrepreneurs Money

 
 

In partnership with the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council (SBE Council), IIA presents the top 10 ways America’s entrepreneurs can save money with broadband.

To see the results in a cool interactive, click on the feature above or head here. You’ll also find our methodology, along with an embed code. Our press release on the study is available in the Press Room.

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Posted by IIA on 04/19 at 11:20 AM

Access to Broadband Internet: Top Ten Areas of Saving - 2011

 
 

Top Ten Areas of Savings 2011

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See Top Ten Areas of Saving from 2010

METHODOLOGY OVERVIEW

In updating the “Top 10 Ways Being Online Saves You Money” report, CFP Nick Delgado looked at the top areas of consumer spending, and the discounts that are available to Internet users.  Based on the 2010 Consumer Expenditure Survey released by the U.S. Department of Labor, Delgado used online resources to find discounts on essentials like housing, apparel, gasoline and food.  He believes the power of group buying sites like LivingSocial and Groupon have changed the way that people shop online, and provide tremendous discounts on leisure activities, restaurants and sporting events.  Other online resources like couponmom.com and gasbuddy.com alert savvy consumers to deals at establishments in their city. Some areas of his analysis, like housing, gasoline and newspaper expenditures, required data specific to certain cities.  For the purposes of this report, he chose five of the top 12 U.S. cities by population (New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville) also keeping geographic diversity in mind. Overall, he found that the savings in this year’s analysis ($7,695) were relatively similar to those in last year’s analysis ($7,707).  He looked at similar products across the board, and used similar websites for comparison.  The below methodology provides more detail as to the calculations used for each savings category.

ONE. HOUSING. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,270/YR (9.8%)

Source: Search based study on apartments in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Sampled 50 online postings in the above markets to determine average cost savings relative to local apartment rent.  Applied 9.8% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on shelter ($12,963) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
  Site examples: www.padmapper.com, www.apartments.com, www.craigslist.org

TWO. AUTOMOTIVE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $438 (A ONETIME SAVINGS OF 1.5%)

Source: Cost analysis based on average new car purchase price in 2010
Methodology: Applied 1.5% savings factor from JMR study to the average 2010 vehicle purchase cost net outlay ($29,217) based on a report by the Detroit Free Press. usatoday.com/money/autos/2010-07-12-carprices12_ST_N.htm

THREE. TRAVEL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,535/YR (20%)

Source: Amadeus Case Study amadeus.com/us/documents/aco/us/BearingPoint.pdf
Methodology: Applied 20% savings factor from Amadeus study to the average amount spent on travel ($7,677) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.

FOUR. FOOD. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $942/YR (26%)

Source: Search based study on basic basket of groceries based on top selling categories (Carbonated beverages, Milk, Fresh bread, Beer, Salty snacks, Natural cheese, Frozen dinners/entrees, Cold cereal, Wine, Cigarettes)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of monthly groceries (3 each of the above mentioned items) to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 26% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on food at home ($3,624) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
    Site example: www.couponmom.com, www.peapod.com

FIVE. NON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $117/YR (30%)

Source: Search based study on common over the counter medicines (Pain Relievers, Antacids, Cold Remedies, Allergy Relief, Natural Remedies)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of the best selling non prescription drugs (5 each of the above mentioned items) to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 30% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on non prescription drugs, which was derived as 10% of the average annual expenditure on healthcare ($3,126) from the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.drugstore.com, www.amazon.com

SIX. GASOLINE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $132/YR (6.2%)

Source: Search based study on lowest gasoline prices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Researched average gas prices within a 10-mile radius of three zip codes for each of the above cities, and found the lowest advertised prices in each, for a savings of 6.2% off of average gasoline expenditure ($2,132) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.gasbuddy.com

SEVEN. ENTERTAINMENT. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $2,444/YR (48.8%)

Source: Search based study on restaurant dining, sporting/concert tickets and leisure activities in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Applied savings factor of 48.8% on dining outside of the home ($2,444) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.  Applied savings factor of 46% on 24 entertainment such as concerts, events and leisure activities to the entertainment budget ($2,693) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.groupon.com, www.livingsocial.com, www.bargainseatsonline.com

EIGHT. APPAREL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $573/YR (33.7%)

Source: Search based study on basic clothing combinations for men and women
Methodology:  Created a set of standard baskets of apparel for a man (khakis, jeans and shirts) and a woman (skirts, jeans and tops) to establish a baseline retail cost in each of five price categories (under $20, $20 - $40, $40 - $60, $60 - $80 and $80 - $100).  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the internet.  Applied 33.7% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on apparel ($1,700) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
    Site example: www.target.com, www.jcrew.com

NINE. NEWSPAPERS. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $195/YR (89.2%)

Source: Search based study reviewing major newspapers in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Calculated the standard annual rate for a daily delivery (including Sunday) subscription for the top three papers in each of the above cities.  Potential savings factor based on average annual daily subscription rates.
Site example: www.nytimes.com, www.chicagotribune.com, www.dallasnews.com 

TEN. BILL PAY. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $47/YR (100%)

Source: Cost analysis based on average consumer’s postage for six bills per month, plus one pay-by-phone charge.
Methodology: Created a to a standard multiple of monthly bills that are traditionally paid via postage (Rent/Mortgage, Gas, Electric, Water, Cable/Phone/Internet, Mobile). Applied average cost per US postal stamp ($0.44) for each monthly bill, plus the savings of one average pay-by-phone charge ($15).
Site examples: www.mycheckfree.com, www.chase.com, www.bankofamerica.com

Posted by admin on 10/10 at 05:03 PM

Benefits of Telemedicine in Remote Communities & Use of Mobile and Wireless Platforms in Healthcare

Download report: 91311_Vo_Telehealth_Paper.pdf
 
 

One of the greatest challenges facing the U.S. healthcare system is to provide quality care to the large segment of the population, which does not have access to specialty physicians because of factors such as geographic limitations or socioeconomic conditions. The use of technology to deliver health care from a distance, or telemedicine, has been demonstrated as an effective way of overcoming certain barriers to care, particularly for communities located in rural and remote areas. In addition, telemedicine can ease the gaps in providing crucial care for those who are underserved, principally because of a shortage of sub-specialty providers. At the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB Health), the use of telecommunications technology for the purpose of improving health care delivery to rural and underserved populations of Texas has been part of one of its core programs since the mid 1990s. Since 1995, clinicians and researchers at UTMB have been testing, refining and utilizing telemedicine and telehealth technologies to improve and develop telemedicine – solving the problems of access to quality medical care.

Posted by admin on 09/12 at 03:38 AM

10 Facts About Broadband and Jobs

 
 

 

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1

— Source: Federal Communications Commission, www.broadband.gov, Accessed 6/24/11
“The Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts that jobs depending on broadband and information and communication technologies (ICT)—such as computer systems analysts, database administrators and media and communications workers—will grow by 25% from 2008–2018, 2.5 times faster than the average across all occupations and industries.”


2

— Source: Joelle Tessler, “Broadband Funding In Stimulus Plan Sparks Debate,” The Associated Press, 2/6/09
“These investments will create new jobs up and down the economic food chain, said Robert Atkinson, president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation. His group estimates that a $10 billion investment in broadband would produce as many as 498,000 new jobs. Those include the construction workers and telecommunications technicians who must dig up streets, lay down fiber-optic lines and install wireless towers, as well as the engineers and factory workers at companies that make the fiber, electronics and computer equipment needed to build the networks. Much of that equipment is made overseas now, but Atkinson’s projections exclude jobs that would go abroad.”


3

— Source: Strategic Networks Group, “e-NC and SNG Release Broadband Findings for North Carolina,” 10/28/11 http://www.sngroup.com/e-nc-and-sng-release-broadband-findings-for-north-carolina/
“Nearly one in five (18%) of new jobs were created as a direct result of Broadband Internet.”


4

— Source: Twin Cities Daily Planet, “Building Broadband Infrastructure for Jobs in Greater Minnesota,” 5/24/11, http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2011/05/24/building-broadband-infrastructure-jobs-greater-minnesota
“…17% of retirees, nearly three out of five unemployed adults, and almost one-third of homemakers say they would likely join the workforce if empowered to do so by teleworking.”


5

— Source: Strategic Networks Group. “Measuring Broadband’s Impact,”  http://www.sngroup.com/broadband-lifecycle/measuring-the-impact-of-broadband/ Accessed 07/26/11
“We have demonstrated that the local economic growth and secondary investment enabled by broadband in 10 times the initial broadband investment and the contribution to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is 15 times the initial investment.”


6

— Source: Federal Communications Commission, www.broadband.gov, Accessed 6/24/11
“Broadband is becoming a prerequisite to economic opportunity for individuals, small businesses and communities. Those without broadband and the skills to use broadband-enabled technologies are becoming more isolated from the modern American economy. This is due in part to the rapidly changing nature of work in the digital age. Sixty-two percent of American workers rely on the Internet to perform their jobs.”



7

— Source: 2008 Robert Half International, http://www.teleworkresearchnetwork.com/telecommuting-statistics, Accessed 7/8/11
“72% of employees say flexible work arrangements would cause them to choose one job over another. 37% specifically cite telecommuting.”


8

— Source: 2009 National Technology Readiness Survey Telecommuting Report, http://www.technoreadymarketing.com/NTRS_2009_Telecommuting_Cost.php, Accessed 7/8/11
“…14 percent telecommute or work at home, of which half (7 percent) telecommute full-time and half (7 percent) do so part-time. Another 9 percent of workers have a job that does not require a commute.”



9

— Source: American Library Association, “New Library Study: Demand Up For Technology, Budget Cuts Limit Access,” Press Release, 6/21/11; http://classic.cnbc.com/id/43480125
“A new national report shows that U.S. public libraries continue to expand as technology centers for communities, providing essential resources for job-seekers and support for critical e-government services. In addition, as the demand for e-books increases, libraries are the starting place for free downloads. … More than 74 percent of libraries offer software and other resources to help patrons create resumes and employment materials, and 72 percent of libraries report that staff helped patrons complete online job applications.”


10

— Source:  Career Change Challenge With Jullien Gordon, “50+ Job Search Statistics You Need To Know,” Posted By Jullien Gordon, 8/10/10
A Recent Posting On Job Search Statistics Revealed:
– “Online Marketing (online resume posting) yields an 8 percent chance of success in uncovering the next opportunity. This rate matches those of 2003 when this strategy was still in its infancy.
– Referrals from within the organization (18 percent) and outside the organization (9 percent) are the most successful ways to land the opportunity.
– A blended strategy of using social networks like LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook, helps identify referral opportunities.”

 

Posted by admin on 08/23 at 04:45 AM

10 Benefits of Health IT

 
 
 

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Sources

1

— Source: Department Of Health & Human Services, healthit.hhs.gov, Accessed 11/6/09
"Interoperable health IT can improve individual patient care in numerous ways, including ... Complete, accurate, and searchable health information, available at the point of diagnosis and care, allowing for more informed decision making to enhance the quality and reliability of health care delivery."


2

— Source: Department Of Health & Human Services, healthit.hhs.gov, Accessed 11/6/09
"Interoperable health IT can improve individual patient care in numerous ways, including ... More efficient and convenient delivery of care, without having to wait for the exchange of records or paperwork and without requiring unnecessary or repetitive tests or procedures."


3

— Source: Department Of Health & Human Services, healthit.hhs.gov, Accessed 11/6/09
Interoperable health IT can improve individual patient care in numerous ways, including ... Earlier diagnosis and characterization of disease, with the potential to thereby improve outcomes and reduce costs."


4

— Source: Department Of Health & Human Services, healthit.hhs.gov, Accessed 11/6/09
"Interoperable health IT can improve individual patient care in numerous ways, including ... Reductions in adverse events through an improved understanding of each patient's particular medical history, potential for drug-drug interactions, or (eventually) enhanced understanding of a patient's metabolism or even genetic profile and likelihood of a positive or potentially harmful response to a course of treatment."


5

— Source: Department Of Health & Human Services, healthit.hhs.gov, Accessed 11/6/09
"Interoperable health IT can improve individual patient care in numerous ways, including ... "Increased efficiencies related to administrative tasks, allowing for more interaction with and transfer of information to patients, caregivers, and clinical care coordinators, and monitoring of patient care."


6

— Source: Liv Osby, "Telemedicine Brings Doctor To Patient," The Greenville News, 3/17/09
The Medical University Of South Carolina Provides Remote Neurology Consultations For Patients At Lowcountry Hospitals - Saving Precious Time And Money. "MUSC has launched a program to provide remote neurology consultations for patients showing signs of stroke at Lowcountry hospitals, Garr said. 'Studies show the first three hours are critical,' he said. 'You link to the hospital using the telemedicine connection, and the physician can see the patient and review the studies to see if he is a candidate for clot busting medicine. And it doesn't require transferring the patient.' Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center is linking up with MUSC's stroke program, said Dr. Jerry Youkey, vice president for medical and academic services. He hopes it also can be used for other neurological conditions. Bon Secours St. Francis Health System also hopes to join the stroke network. 'The technology offers so many innovative concepts for patient care,' said chief nursing officer Teri Ficicchy. 'It's very exciting for St. Francis to be a partner in these pioneering projects.'"


7

— Source: Kim Painter, "Diagnosis By 'Telemedicine' Can Save Stroke Victims," USA Today, 2/15/09
A Phoenix Neurologist Was Able To Help A Stroke Victim 200 Miles Away Because Of Access To A "Telestroke" System. "Phoenix neurologist Bart Demaerschalk was enjoying Thanksgiving dessert at home when he got a message: A woman in an emergency room 200 miles away in Kingman had developed slurred speech and drooping facial muscles during her own holiday dinner. Within minutes, Demaerschalk was looking at the patient, asking her questions, going over her brain scan and confirming a diagnosis: stroke. Demaerschalk is no superhero. He made that 200-mile leap with the help of a two-way video and audio link set up just for such consultations. And it mattered. As a result of the 'telestroke' consultation, he and the woman's local doctors agreed she should be treated with a clot-busting drug that could restore normal blood flow in her brain and lessen her risk of lasting disability."


8

— Source: Ben Worthen, "Doctor, Can You See Me Now?" The Wall Street Journal, 10/13/09
Telemedicine/Video Connections Between Specialists In Urban Medical Centers And Smaller Local Hospitals Increases Timeliness Of Treatment And Decreases Transfer Rates And Associated Costs. "Experiences like Mr. Buirge's may become more common as hospitals increasingly install video technology to connect local and regional hospitals to large urban medical centers where most specialists practice. The video hookups, which usually include high-definition TVs, a camera, and Internet-connected medical equipment, provide a way for smaller hospitals to tap these specialists' expertise when necessary. That boosts the chances patients will receive timely treatment and lowers transfer rates. Video medicine is useful for diagnosing a range of ailments that rely heavily on visual inspection, advocates say. In addition to strokes, the systems can be used by faraway dermatologists to determine the severity of burns and other skin conditions, and by trauma specialists to assess the severity of a wound. Neonatal specialists are using video systems to figure out from afar whether a newborn needs intensive care."


9

— Drew Johnson, "Otterbox Cases Offer Robust Smartphone Protection," www.firerecruit.com, 6/21/11
First Responders Are Becoming Increasingly Dependent On Smartphones To Do Their Jobs. "With each new iteration of the iPhone, iPad, Blackberry or Android phone, consumers are faced with the same question: 'How will I protect this device from the inevitable drops, falls, bangs, dings, and scratches that inevitably arise from daily use?' That is even more relevant for first responders who, with the ever-growing use of fire, EMS and police apps, are becoming increasingly dependent on these pocket-sized computers to do their jobs. For civilians, a broken smartphone means an interruption in their quest to defeat Angry Birds. For first responders, a broken smartphone could mean a lost life or a hamstrung investigation."


10

— Source: U.S. Chamber Of Commerce, "The Impact Of Broadband On Senior Citizens," www.uschamber.com, 12/08
U.S. Chamber Of Commerce Healthcare Benefits Highlights: – Broadband is enhancing senior wellness and preventive care. – Broadband is enabling lifesaving and life enhancing telemedicine services like in-home monitoring. – The potential for broadband-enabled healthcare services and applications is tremendous.

Posted by admin on 07/21 at 05:00 AM

Access to Broadband Internet: Top Ten Areas of Saving - 2010

 
 

“Beyond the dollars that can be saved with an Internet connection, being online brings unquantifiable advantages like access to education, job opportunities, social networking and on-demand information,” said Bruce Mehlman, IIA co-chairman. “Congress and the FCC should focus their efforts on policies that encourage investment in more robust networks and policies that expand digital literacy to those offline, rather than aggressive regulatory detours that discourage investment.” — Bruce Mehlman

Copy-n-paste this code to include the cost savings graphic on your website

<img src=“http://internetinnovation.org/images/site/IIA_cost_savings_graphic.jpg”
width=“500” height=“1630” alt=“10 ways being online saves you money” />




ONE. HOUSING. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $974/YR (7.67%)

Source: Search based study on apartments in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Sampled 50 online postings in the above markets to determine average cost savings relative to local apartment rent.  Applied 7.67% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on shelter ($12,697) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
  Site examples: www.padmapper.com, www.apartments.com, www.craigslist.org

TWO. AUTOMOTIVE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $438 (A ONETIME SAVINGS OF 1.5%)

Source: Cost analysis based on average new car purchase price in 2010
Methodology: Applied 1.5% savings factor from JMR study to the average 2010 vehicle purchase cost net outlay ($29,217) based on a report by the Detroit Free Press. usatoday.com/money/autos/2010-07-12-carprices12_ST_N.htm

THREE. TRAVEL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $1,532/YR (20%)

Source: Amadeus Case Study amadeus.com/us/documents/aco/us/BearingPoint.pdf
Methodology: Applied 20% savings factor from Amadeus study to the average amount spent on travel ($7,658) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.

FOUR. FOOD. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $965/YR (25.70%)

Source: Search based study on basic basket of groceries based on top selling categories (Carbonated beverages, Milk, Fresh bread, Beer, Salty snacks, Natural cheese, Frozen dinners/entrees, Cold cereal, Wine, Cigarettes)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of monthly groceries to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 25.7% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on food at home ($3,753) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
    Site example: www.couponmom.com, www.peapod.com

FIVE. NON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS. $76/YR (24.20%)

Source: Search based study on common over the counter medicines (Pain Relievers, Antacids, Cold Remedies, Allergy Relief, Natural Remedies)
Methodology: Created a standard basket of the best selling non prescription drugs to establish a baseline retail cost.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the internet.  Potential savings based on cost reductions at the aggregate basket level.  Applied 24.2% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on non prescription drugs, which was derived as 10% of the average annual expenditure on healthcare ($3,126) from the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.drugstore.com, www.amazon.com

SIX. GASOLINE. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $95/YR (4.76%)

Source: Search based study on lowest gasoline prices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Researched average gas prices within a 10-mile radius of three zip codes for each of the above cities, and found the lowest advertised prices in each, for a savings of 4.76% off of average gasoline expenditure ($1,986) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.gasbuddy.com

SEVEN. ENTERTAINMENT. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $2,747/YR (51.72%)

Source: Search based study on restaurant dining, sporting/concert tickets and leisure activities in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology: Applied savings factor of 57.6% on dining outside of the home ($2,619) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.  Applied savings factor of 46% on entertainment such as concerts, events and leisure activities to the entertainment budget ($2,693) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
Site example: www.groupon.com, www.livingsocial.com, www.bargainseatsonline.com

EIGHT. APPAREL. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $640/YR (37.12%)

Source: Search based study on basic clothing combinations for men and women
Methodology:  Created a set of standard baskets of apparel for a man (khakis/jeans and shirts) and a woman (skirts/jeans and tops) to establish a baseline retail cost in each of five price categories.  Conducted a series of online searches against the baseline to identify cost savings exclusive to the internet.  Applied 37.12% savings factor to the average annual expenditure on apparel ($1,725) based on the Department of Labor annual study on consumer expenditures.
    Site example: www.overstock.com, www.ideeli.com

NINE. NEWSPAPERS. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $193/YR (100%)

Source: Search based study reviewing major newspapers in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dallas and Jacksonville
Methodology:  Calculated the standard annual rate for a daily delivery (including Sunday) subscription for the top three papers in each of the above cities.  Potential savings factor based on average annual daily subscription rates.
Site example: www.nytimes.com, www.chicagotribune.com, www.dallasnews.com 

TEN. BILL PAY. POTENTIAL SAVINGS: $47/YR (100%)

Source: Cost analysis based on average consumer’s postage for six bills per month, plus one pay-by-phone charge.
Methodology: Created a to a standard multiple of monthly bills that are traditionally paid via postage (Rent/Mortgage, Gas, Electric, Water, Cable/Phone/Internet, Mobile). Applied average cost per US postal stamp ($0.44) for each monthly bill, plus the savings of one average pay-by-phone charge ($15).
Site examples: www.mycheckfree.com, www.chase.com, www.bankofamerica.com

Posted by IIA on 11/08 at 07:09 PM

Net Neutrality & Broadband Access: Hindrance or Help?

Download report: Net_Neutrality_and_Broadband_Access_Stratecast_82010.pdf
 
 

As a function of tracking the consumer communications services market, Stratecast pays close attention to market externalities. In particular, over the last year we have looked at the impact that government regulation is having on the deployment of broadband networks and services in the consumer space. Starting with a study in July 2009 on net neutrality and broadband stimulus, we began examining the impact of governmental stimulus programs on the broadband market. We continued that theme in a more recent study on net neutrality.

Initially, our modeling indicated that the broadband stimulus efforts contained a great deal of uncertainty. In fact, the outcome was sufficiently cloudy that we noted that broadband stimulus funding was largely irrelevant to broadband penetration when combined with net neutrality regulations. We noted then, that within confidence margins, it was possible to conclude that broadband stimulus funding was merely offsetting the cost of net neutrality. Our projections of broadband penetration without such externalities showed an equivalent outcome over time.

Our more recent work concentrated on the various market constituents—operators, service providers, the economy generally and consumers—to determine the impact of net neutrality rules on each. Once again, we noted that the results, although uncertain, generally pointed in the direction of negative impacts. Once again, those negative impacts were sufficient to offset any virtue accruing from broadband stimulus.

In the meantime, the FCC was reconsidering its position with respect to broadband. When the U.S. District Court for Washington D.C. concluded that the agency had acted inappropriately in its actions to censure Comcast over net neutrality violations, it effectively placed in doubt any government regulation of the broadband service space. Rather than debate the ruling, the FCC instead proceeded to propose conventional common carriage regulation of broadband. Although designed for the monopoly telephone environment of 1934, the FCC indicated it was willing to adopt that regulatory framework for data networking, with the option to forebear on any regulations that didn’t match the new networking environment. As expected, this approach pleased no one. The issue is still proceeding within the FCC, with a possible rule making as early as autumn 2010.

Of course, regardless of the outcome, the operators and public policy groups will likely continue to pursue this issue through the courts. In the meantime, the actual scope and impact of any new regulation remains largely unknown. As we noted in our most recent study, it is this uncertainty that is anathema to new broadband investment.

However, as all of this has been debated and litigated, the stimulus program has been proceeding as well. At this point in time, 68 applications for stimulus funding have been approved. The question is, has broadband penetration increased as a result?

Unfortunately, the answer seems to be no. Although recent activities by network operators suggest that some additional build out is taking place, Frost & Sullivan tracking data does not indicate a substantial increase in access. In fact, the current rate of broadband growth is slowing.

The implication is clear: stimulus, in the absence of market certainty of governmental influence, is not having a significant impact on broadband penetration. Public policy should note this and move to reduce the uncertainty faced by the market as soon as possible.

Posted by IIA on 08/12 at 02:07 AM

IIA Broadband Ambassador Letter to the Hill

 
 

Dear Chairmen Rockefeller and Waxman, Ranking Members Hutchison and Barton:

We write in our continued support of your worthy mission of encouraging universal broadband deployment and adoption for all Americans and in response to your calls for input from constituents.  In short, we are writing because we at the Internet Innovation Alliance believe broadband is an essential element to our economic and national success in the 21st century.

Like a majority of your compatriots in Congress who have made their concerns publicly known, we are very worried that the so-called “third way” proposal of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) might impose new and potentially sweeping regulations on broadband services under Title II of the 1934 Telecommunications Act. This represents a distraction from an otherwise comprehensive approach to broadband laid out by FCC Chairman Genachowski, and it has the potential to undermine billions in private investment needed to upgrade networks, expand coverage and grow our still-struggling economy. We urge you as leading Members of Congress to encourage regulatory restraint and a more thoughtful and deliberate approach as it pertains to broadband regulation.

It is our shared belief that the proposed new and unexpected regulations —regulating broadband information services as telephone utility services – are far more likely to widen the digital divide than close it. According to the vast majority of market analysts, such an unexpected sea change to established broadband policy would deter new investment where and when it is needed most. Furthermore, unexpected regulation will potentially exacerbate persistent demographic gaps by pricing broadband beyond the reach of many low and moderate-income Americans.

We need carefully-focused and narrowly-tailored legislation that empowers the FCC to advance core consensus elements of the National Broadband Plan, including initiatives to promote digital literacy, universal service reform, and spectrum availability.

We believe that minimal regulation and consistent bipartisanship lead to maximum investment and innovation. Regrettably, the “third way” expanding Title II would maximize regulation. Applying old regulations to new technologies merely because it seems legally viable will not solve current market realities, no matter how well they are implemented or how much the FCC promises to forbear. With great insight, you and the rest of the United States Congress have stepped up in a bipartisan fashion and explained to the FCC that it needs to slow down and approach broadband regulation in a focused and targeted way.

Let us work together to provide targeted and measurable goals for the FCC, removing much of the uncertainty that has been created since the unveiling of the National Broadband Plan. After all, the goal of the National Broadband Plan is to create certainty that leads to universal broadband access, not more regulation that impedes deployment and adoption by unserved and underserved Americans.

Thank you for your careful consideration of our views.

Sincerely,

Posted by admin on 07/20 at 03:53 AM

IIA’s Response to the FCC NOI on Broadband Reclassification

Download report: 71510_IIA_NOI_Filing.docx
 
 

Chairman Julius Genachowski
Commissioner Meredith Attwell Baker
Commissioner Mignon Clyburn
Commissioner Michael J. Copps
Commissioner Robert M. McDowell

Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street, SW
Washington, DC 20554

GN Docket No. 10-127

July 15, 2010

Dear Chairman Genachowski and Commissioners Baker, Clyburn, Copps and McDowell:

Thank you for the opportunity to offer comments on the proposal to bring broadband information services under Title II of the 1934 Act.  While we share your goals of preserving an open Internet and enabling universal broadband deployment and adoption, we fear the proposed “third way” approach will undermine these objectives, reducing investment, stalling economic recovery and inhibiting the pace of broadband progress in America. 

This proposal seems intended to fit changed legal circumstances rather than evolving market realities. It could disserve consumers by threatening the continued growth of the industry at a time when increased innovation, investment and job creation are critical to the economy. Recognizing this reality, a bipartisan majority in Congress has urged the Commission to shelve this proposal and let the elected lawmakers lead. Instead of re-defining new technologies to fit old regulatory categories, the FCC should allow Congress to craft clear and narrowly tailored authority that enables the Commission to accomplish specific, focused objectives.

The Internet Innovation Alliance believes the biggest challenges to universal broadband adoption in America right now include:

    The need for ongoing investment in network capacity (up to $350 billion according to FCC estimates) despite significant economic headwinds and uncertainty for investors, to support the bandwidth required by 50,000,000 new customers and ever-more-robust applications;
The need for digital literacy programs that target the 37 percent of Americans who have access to broadband but have not signed up for service, either because they do not know how to use the services or do not appreciate how it would benefit their lives; 
The need to expand the amount of wireless spectrum available while enhancing effective network management strategies;
The need to improve enforcement efforts in the face of exponentially-increasing cyber attacks and fraud.

The IIA shares the belief that competition among ISPs and the free and open nature of the Internet have been essential to broadband’s success and remain critical to its future.  However, the free and open Internet is not at risk.  We are unaware of any current examples of ISPs “blocking or degrading” web sites or broadband traffic.  And the few allegedly “bad actions” by ISPs over the past five years have quickly resulted in prompt reversals.  The FCC should not expand regulatory risk, even with promises of forbearance, to protect against hypothetical harm.

Of great concern, this proposal threatens to undermine investment by adding significant uncertainty and depressing returns.  Analysts and expert observers have overwhelmingly identified this proposal as a negative blow to America’s economic recovery and investment in broadband.  For example:

  “Reclassifying broadband to bring it under FCC jurisdiction is the ‘the nuclear option’...This would call into question virtually every assumption about the terminal value of networks…Markets abhor uncertainty. Today (day of FCC’s announcement that it will push forward with Title II reclassification of broadband) we got uncertainty in spades…this development is an unequivocal negative.” (Sanford Bernstein Senior Analyst Craig Moffett)
  “...Decreased investments by broadband service providers will hinder capital expenditures by others in the ecosystem, particularly those at the edge…the imposition of network neutrality rules could have devastating impacts across the ecosystem between 2010 and 2015. A 10 percent decrease in investment by wireline and wireless broadband service providers, coupled with likely spillover effects, could result in the loss of 502,000 jobs across the entire ecosystem and would have a negative impact on U.S. GDP on the order of approximately $62 billion per year.” (Study: Davidson, Charles and Bret Swanson. “Net Neutrality, Investment & Jobs: Assessing the Potential Impacts of the FCC’s Proposed Net Neutrality Rules on the Broadband Ecosystem.” New York Law School. June 2010.)
  “Net neutrality acts like a tax on the Internet. It imposes overheads on network operators, which, in turn, decrease network investments, providing less opportunity, not only for the operators, but also for those that use the operators’ networks as well.” (Study: Jude, Michael. “Net Neutrality: Impact on the Consumer and Economic Growth.” Frost & Sullivan. May 2010.)
“[The “third-way” regulation angle] creates potential long-term negative investment (and competitive) implications for major cable broadband providers.” (Standard & Poor’s Analyst Tuna Amobi)

IIA also fears the proposed new regulations are more likely to widen the digital divide than close it.  By deterring new investment where and when it is needed most, this regulatory approach could add to the cost of service and price broadband beyond the reach of many low and moderate-income Americans.  Experts on the digital divide have not cited “lack of common carrier regulations” as either a cause or a cure for race or income-based differences in broadband adoption.  Nor did former Pew researcher John Horrigan find any non-users of broadband citing concerns over the future of the free and open Internet as the basis for their failure to buy broadband. 

A groundbreaking December 2009 poll of 700 African Americans and 200 Latinos conducted by former Obama Campaign pollster Cornell Belcher found that the main reasons that non-Internet users in communities of color remain offline are (1) they do not see the need/value, (2) they lack computers or smart phones and (3) they lack the digital literacy and online confidence.  We understand how to remedy all of these challenges, none of which would be solved or even addressed by this proposal.

We believe that minimal regulation and consistent bipartisanship will lead to maximum investment and innovation.  Regrettably, the “third way” expanding Title II would maximize regulation and ignore the bipartisan majority. The Commission should shelve this proposal and await focused and narrowly-tailored legislation from Congress that authorizes core elements of the National Broadband Plan, including initiatives to promote digital literacy, universal service reform and expand spectrum availability. 

Thank you for your careful consideration of our views.

Sincerely,

Bruce Mehlman & David Sutphen

Co-Chairmen, Internet Innovation Alliance

 

Posted by admin on 07/15 at 07:43 AM

Mobile Access 2010

Download report: Mobile_Access_2010_PewResearchCenter_72010.pdf
 
 

Principal findings: Six in ten Americans go online wirelessly using a laptop or cell phone; African-Americans and 18-29 year olds lead the way in the use of cell phone data applications, but older adults are gaining ground.


Six in ten adult Americans are now wireless internet users, and mobile data applications have grown more popular over the last year.

As of May 2010, 59% of all adult Americans go online wirelessly. Our definition of a wireless internet user includes the following activities:

  • Going online with a laptop using a wi-fi connection or mobile broadband card. Roughly half of all adults (47%) go online in this way, up from the 39% who did so at a similar point in 2009.
  • Use the internet, email or instant messaging on a cell phone. Two in five adults (40%) do at least one of these using a mobile device, an increase from the 32% of adults who did so in 2009.

Taken together, 59% of American adults now go online wirelessly using either a laptop or cell phone, an increase over the 51% of Americans who did so at a similar point in 2009.

Cell phone ownership has remained stable over the last year, but users are taking advantage of a much wider range of their phones’ capabilities compared with a similar point in 2009. Of the eight mobile data applications we asked about in both 2009 and 2010, all showed statistically significant year-to-year growth.

This year we also asked for the first time about seven additional cell phone activities. Among all cell phone owners:

  • 54% have used their mobile device to send someone a photo or video
  • 23% have accessed a social networking site using their phone
  • 20% have used their phone to watch a video
  • 15% have posted a photo or video online
  • 11% have purchased a product using their phone
  • 11% have made a charitable donation by text message
  • 10% have used their mobile phones to access a status update service such as Twitter

Posted by IIA on 07/07 at 04:56 AM

Fabricating a Broadband Crisis? More Evidence on the Misleading Inferences from OECD Rankings

Download report: Misleading_Inferences_from_OECD_Rankings_PhoenixCenter_72010.pdf
 
 

The late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan was famous for observing that “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” If only current policymakers heeded such wisdom when it comes to citing international rankings of broadband penetration as a justification for aggressive public policy interventions.

Indeed, there are many policymakers (and policy peddlers) in this country—including current Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski—that (apparently) believe that the U.S. is “falling behind” in broadband adoption and, therefore, aggressive regulatory intervention is required to remove this blight from our national reputation. This belief is derived largely from data on broadband connections collected and reported by the Organization for Economic and Cooperative Development (“OECD”). Every six months, the OECD releases its data on per-capita broadband connections for its thirty member countries, and these countries are listed in descending order based on per-capita connections.  This practice presents the data in terms of a rank, and that rank has (regrettably) become the standard by which to judge the successes and failures of broadband policy in this and other countries.

In numerous papers, I have debunked the idea that the OECD rankings can be used as a measure of relative performance. One reason per-capita connections are an invalid measure of-capita connections are an invalid measure of broadband penetration is that each country has its own unique maximum value for the measure (all share zero as the minimum).  In other words, if in every OECD country every household and business had broadband (the “Broadband Nirvana”), you would still observe large differences in their per-capita subscription rates.  As such, each country’s per-capita subscription rate has its own scale, and consequently, comparing per-capita connections presents the quintessential apples-to-oranges problem. Moreover, in this Nirvana, the U.S. ranks 20th, five spots below its present position.  Consequently, if near ubiquitous adoption across the OECD is the expected outcome (even for just the more developed economies), then the U.S. will always have a middling rank. 

Also, as I have argued before, when interpreting rank it is essential to first establish an expectation of rank.  Without a meaningful expectation, it is impossible to say whether our observed rank is too high, too low, or just right.  In PERSPECTIVE NO. 08-03, Broadband Expectations and the Convergence of Ranks, I provide compelling evidence that the U.S. is meeting expectations on broadband connections per capita (a rank close to 15th is expected even with good performance).That is, there is no “broadband crisis.”

Posted by IIA on 07/07 at 01:53 AM

The Economic Impact of Broadband Investment

Download report: Economic_Impact_of_Broadband_Investment_Broadband_for_America_.pdf
 
 

In this paper we analyze the economic impact of broadband deployment on consumer welfare, job creation, and economic output. This study represents an update of prior studies conducted in 2001 and 2003, in which we made several projections based on the best available data at the time. We begin by comparing those predictions against the actual U.S. broadband experience during the past decade. As it turns out, many of our predictions concerning economic welfare and employment/output effects were conservative because we could not envision the myriad applications made possible by broadband connections; nor could we envision the rate at which broadband access prices would fall. In a largely deregulatory climate, broadband penetration skyrocketed to nearly 65 percent penetration by the end of the decade as absolute and quality-adjusted prices fell, and first-generation technologies—cable modem, DSL, and 3G wireless—individually covered approximately 90 percent of all U.S. households and collectively covered even more.

In the second part of the paper, we analyze how much additional investment will naturally occur to wire the country with next-generation technologies. That new investment will expand domestic output and it will create jobs. We also estimate the output and job effects under an alternative scenario in which next-generation deployment is accelerated and is expanded in scope. Recognizing our limited ability to conceptualize next=generation applications, we attempt to estimate the spillover effect of next-generation technologies on other sectors of the economy. Finally, we briefly assess various policy options facing regulators. Given the amount of investment that continues to be deployed in this sector and the precarious current state of the U.S. economy, and given the linkage between that investment and jobs/output, regulators must diligently avoid taking any steps that might undermine the industry’s incentives to invest.

Posted by admin on 06/30 at 07:22 AM

Net Neutrality, Investment & Jobs: Assessing the Potential Impacts of the FCC’s Proposed Regulations

Download report: Impact_of_Net_Neutrality_NewYorkLawSchool_62010.pdf
 
 

Sustained capital investments in broadband infrastructure have generated hundreds of thousands of U.S. jobs and annually contribute tens of billions of dollars to U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The proliferation of fast wireline and wireless networks has spurred edge innovators to develop new services, applications, devices, and cutting-edge content. Broadband has thus become a critical component of the nation’s economic infrastructure. Broadband is also the focus of myriad federal initiatives, culminating most notably in the FCC’s National Broadband Plan, which recognizes that broadband enables the delivery of an array of market-enhancing services like real-time telemedicine and smart energy tools. The nation’s robust broadband ecosystem stems directly from the stable, light-touch regulatory approach that the FCC carefully developed and consistently implemented over the last several years.


The innovative vibrancy evident throughout the broadband ecosystem is in danger of being undermined by FCC proposals, including the impending application of common carrier regulations to some elements of the Internet, that would both overturn decades of precedent and fundamentally alter existing and future business models of broadband service providers. For a capital intensive sector like U.S. broadband – one that has invested hundreds of billions of dollars in network expansion and upgrades over the past decade, and that has directly generated hundreds of thousands of jobs in the communications sectors and many thousands more in related industries – the FCC’s proposed actions are enormously significant. Especially at a time when the national economy is attempting to recover from a major and enduring downturn and private sector job creation remains a concern, the destabilizing impacts of the FCC’s proposals place the nation’s economy at even greater risk. 


The FCC’s Proposed Network Neutrality Rules & The Likely Negative Impacts on the Broadband Ecosystem


As the broadband ecosystem and consumer demand continue to evolve at a rapid and oftentimes unpredictable pace, new sources of revenue will be needed to assure that more data-intensive uses are supported and that additional network upgrades and expansions are adequately funded. Indeed, some predict that, without the ability to adapt business models to shifting utilization patterns, some service providers, especially those in the wireless arena, could become unprofitable. Thus, the FCC’s network neutrality proposals, which would prohibit or restrict several new business models, threaten to constrain the ability of the market to identify and pursue sources of much needed revenues and to deliver new services. 


This paper estimates a range of job and investment losses that are likely to result from the implementation of the FCC’s proposed net neutrality rules. In particular, the entire broadband ecosystem is sensitive to changes in regulation since the sector has evolved and thrived under a light-touch regulatory regime. Indeed, many estimate that, in the absence of the FCC’s network neutrality proposals, investment and job growth will continue apace across the sector. This paper supports estimates that broadband service providers will commit at least $30 billion annually in capital expenditures on broadband alone between 2010 and 2015, resulting in the creation or sustainment of 509,000 jobs. These investments will spur capital expenditures by others in the ecosystem. To this end, a 5 percent incremental increase in capital expenditures by these ecosystem companies could boost investment by approximately $18 billion per year between 2010 and 2015, and yield an additional 450,000 jobs created or sustained. Conversely, decreased investments by broadband service providers will hinder capital expenditures by others in the ecosystem, particularly those at the edge. The analyses in this paper indicate that the imposition of network neutrality rules could have devastating impacts across the ecosystem between 2010 and 2015.

Posted by admin on 06/15 at 05:56 AM

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