Because every American
should have access
to broadband Internet.

The Internet Innovation Alliance is a broad-based coalition of business and non-profit organizations that aim to ensure every American, regardless of race, income or geography, has access to the critical tool that is broadband Internet. The IIA seeks to promote public policies that support equal opportunity for universal broadband availability and adoption so that everyone, everywhere can seize the benefits of the Internet - from education to health care, employment to community building, civic engagement and beyond.

The Podium

Wednesday, June 18

Good Idea of the Day

By Brad

Wireless organization CTIA wants to focus on getting more spectrum to the market for mobile broadband. As Phil Goldstein of FierceWireless reports:

CTIA President Meredith Attwell Baker wants to create a spectrum “report card” that would assess how efficiently government agencies are using their spectrum. That’s one piece of a broader agenda she has for getting more airwaves for mobile broadband use beyond this fall’s coming auction of AWS-3 spectrum and next year’s incentive auction of 600 MHz broadcast TV spectrum. 

Baker, who became the head of the wireless industry’s trade association and lobbying arm earlier this month, said a report card would “keep people’s feet to the fire to make sure we’re utilizing the spectrum, [and that] we’re not warehousing it.” She said that CTIA is going to continue to work towards the goal President Obama laid out in 2010 to free up 500 MHz of spectrum for mobile and fixed wireless broadband use by 2020. Baker said CTIA might push to go beyond that but wants to hit that milestone.

Given the popularity smartphones and tablets — and the mobile broadband that power them — making sure the single-largest holder of the nation’s airwaves, the government, is using those airwaves most efficiently is a critical step in keeping the mobile broadband economy booming.

 

Friday, June 13

Not Ready for Glass

By Brad

Last night, The Daily Show looked into Google Glass. The result was predictably hilarious.

Happy Friday!

Sitting This One Out

By Brad

At today’s FCC open meeting, Chairman Tom Wheeler recused himself from the Commission’s work on the transition to all-IP networks. As Kate Tummarello of The Hill reports:

At the agency’s June open meeting on Friday, Wheeler announced that he would not participate in the agency’s work on this topic, citing his tenure on the Board of Directors for telecom company EarthLink, which recently filed to participate.

Wheeler served on EarthLink’s Board of Directors for ten years before resigning last year after the Senate confirmed him to be FCC chairman.

 

Wednesday, June 11

Keeping Twitter Afloat

By Brad

Tomorrow, the biggest sporting event in the world — the World Cup — kicks off in Brazil. At Fast Company, Neal Ungerleider writes about how Twitter is working to ensure their service doesn’t buckle from the massive surge in traffic:

Raffi Krikorian is one of Twitter’s main engineers who keeps the service’s backend working. Krikorian, a vice president of platform engineering, helms a team (which encompasses approximately one third of Twitter’s software engineers) responsible for preventing outages and making sure the service is available.

“I’ve been here just shy of five years, and I still have PTSD from the last World Cup at Twitter,” Krikorian told me. “When you come to my floor at Twitter headquarters, we have signs all over the floor with a countdown to the World Cup. Reliability is at the top of our minds, and reliability first is the mantra. Somewhere in the world, there is a sporting event, an election, or an earthquake.”

But it also poses very specific engineering challenges for Twitter. Krikorian’s team plans for the World Cup using worst-case scenarios of extremely high site traffic. One hypothetical he brought up on the phone was a Brazil-Japan match; Twitter’s market penetration in Japan is massive and a Japanese television show holds the record for inspiring the most tweets-per-second.

Four years ago, the World Cup created a whopping 150,000 tweets per hour. Given how much the service has grown in popularity since then, expect that number to be even more massive this year.

Mobile Money

By Brad

Over at The Hill, Tim Devaney highlights an interesting report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that shows how mobile banking can be beneficial to low-income people:

The bureau said 74,000 people each day signed up for mobile banking services last year, many of whom are low-income individuals whose only access to the Internet is through their phone, the agency said.

According to a Federal Reserve study, 39 percent of underbanked people use mobile banking applications.

Percentage of the Day

By Brad

84%, which is how much Internet traffic Cisco expects to be video in four years. As Marina Lopes of Reuters reports:

Video consumption of the World Cup alone will generate nearly as much Internet traffic as occurred in all of Australia in 2013, according to a new Cisco Systems Inc report that shows growth in Internet traffic is fueled by video.

The report, which says video is expected to grow to 84 percent of Internet traffic in the United States by 2018 from 78 percent currently, raises questions about whether Internet service providers should prioritize traffic, which has become a controversial issue.

“In the future at some point every month is going to look like the world cup month because the consumption just keeps getting bigger and bigger,” said Robert Pepper, Cisco’s vice president of global technology policy.

Often forgotten in the great net neutrality debate is the fact that bandwidth-intensive video is the future of the Internet. And that presents some very real engineering challenges.

Friday, June 06

The Better Way Forward

By IIA

With the net neutrality debate once again on the front burner, AT&T Senior Executive Vice President Jim Cicconi has penned a lengthy post at the company’s Public Policy Blog to break down how reclassifying broadband service under Title II is a bad idea for just about everyone with a stake in the open Internet. An excerpt:

Title II would not prohibit the creation of fast lanes and slow lanes on the Internet — that is clear in the plain language of the law, not to mention 80 years of FCC precedent and court decisions.  Arguments to the contrary are pure fantasy. At a minimum, Title II supporters have to concede that their argument depends on the bank shot that an appellate court will agree (a) that the FCC can change its mind about how the Internet works after the Supreme Court has validated its prior decision; and (b) the FCC can then ignore the plain language of the statute and 80 years of precedent to determine that the prohibition of “unjust and unreasonable” discrimination actually means it can prohibit any discrimination. And think of all the additional proceedings that will be needed to unpack where we draw the lines between information services “haves” and telecommunications services “have nots.” If that is the road we choose to travel, the investment uncertainty alone will have a massive negative impact on American broadband deployment for years to come.

There’s another important argument against Title II — invoking it would risk massive collateral damage to many, if not most, U.S. Internet companies. Title II could turn every edge or content company into a common carrier for at least part, if not all, of their services.

Cicconi goes on to argue that FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler already has a way to ensure an open Internet without the regulatory hammer of Title II:

Section 706, as interpreted by the court and explained by Chairman Wheeler, does provide a path. It’s a path AT&T supports. For one, it has already been blessed as a valid source of jurisdiction to address the kinds of concerns articulated by Chairman Wheeler and others throughout the current debate. In upholding Section 706 authority, the Verizon court gave the FCC wide latitude to prohibit conduct that would deter broadband investment. And the approach that Chairman Wheeler has proposed would clearly prevent practices like paid prioritization that we feel would change the fundamental nature of the Internet.

Thursday, June 05

Merger Rumblings

By Brad

Via David Gelles and Nichael J. De La Merced at The New York Times, the long rumored merger between Sprint and T-Mobile is starting to heat up:

Sprint and T-Mobile have talked about a combination for years but continued to put it off, each preoccupied with other deals, and concerned about scrutiny from antitrust regulators.

But in recent days, the two sides have settled on the terms of a $32 billion deal that is likely to be announced this summer, people briefed on the matter said on Wednesday.

Under the terms of the deal, which are still preliminary, Sprint would acquire T-Mobile for about $40 a share in cash and stock, a 17 percent premium to Wednesday’s price.

Between this, the proposed Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger and, to a lesser extent the proposed AT&T-DirecTV coupling, the DOJ and FCC have a lot of work ahead of them.

Break Through the Gridlock

By Brad

At The Hill, George S. Ford, chief economist of the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal & Economic Public Policy Studies, warns that dysfunction in Congress could soon have a dramatic effect on Internet adoption:

[W]hen the Internet was in its nascency, Congress sought to encourage adoption by keeping prices affordable. To do so, Congress passed the ITFA, which imposed a three-year moratorium on the imposition of (new) state and local taxes on Internet access. Given that state and local governments aggressively and discriminatorily tax communications services, the moratorium aimed to reduce prices significantly and, consequently, encourage adoption. Since 1998, this moratorium has been extended three times, and is due to expire again in November 2014. While there is generally broad bipartisan support to extend — if not make permanent — the ITFA’s moratorium, given congressional gridlock, there are no guarantees.

With November 2014 rapidly approaching, the question policymakers now need to ask themselves is how a failure to extend the ITFA will affect these efforts to expand broadband adoption? Using both economic theory and empirical evidence, it is possible to make some predictions about the economic effects of failing to extend the ITFA. It isn’t pretty.

Ford predicts a potential loss of 30-60 million broadband connections if Congress fails to act on extending ITFA. Not pretty indeed.

Tuesday, June 03

Dept. of Making You Feel Old

By Brad

Remember how awesome the Internet was in the 1990s? Well, kids these days would disagree with you:

Page 3 of 291 pages  <  1 2 3 4 5 >  Last »