Because every American
should have access
to broadband Internet.

The Internet Innovation Alliance is a broad-based coalition of business and non-profit organizations that aim to ensure every American, regardless of race, income or geography, has access to the critical tool that is broadband Internet. The IIA seeks to promote public policies that support equal opportunity for universal broadband availability and adoption so that everyone, everywhere can seize the benefits of the Internet - from education to health care, employment to community building, civic engagement and beyond.

Wednesday, May 25

Boucher in The Hill

By Brad

With online privacy once again a hot topic inside the Beltway, our own Honorary Chairman Rick Boucher has tackled the issue in an op-ed for The Hill. An excerpt:

The Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) asymmetric approach to internet privacy is likely to create a false sense of security among web users. Despite stringent FCC privacy regulation of internet service providers (ISPs), consumers’ information will enjoy little protection when they are interacting on social media sites, shopping online or surfing the web.

The recent Senate hearing on Internet privacy that featured FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler and Commissioner Ajit Pai, along with Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairwoman Edith Ramirez and Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen, underscored that the FCC’s approach to internet privacy — singling out ISPs while leaving the privacy practices of edge providers essentially unregulated — is unbalanced.

Check out Boucher’s full op-ed over at The Hill.

Thursday, May 05

A Look at Broadband & the U.S. Economy

By IIA

U.S. Broadband and ICT Sector Adds More than $1 Trillion in Annual Value for the American Economy under Light-Touch Regulation

Report authors Hassett and Shapiro argue that the broadband/ICT sector has grown dramatically under light regulation, and increased regulation could slow Internet ecosystem investment and impair other sectors that depend on broadband/ICT technologies

For the past decade, the broadband and information and communications technologies (ICT) sector has fueled enormous growth and development in the American economy, according to a new 20-page report from the Internet Innovation Alliance (IIA) that analyzes broad trends in the economic value, output, and employment in this key sector. The study concludes that the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) effort to impose Title II regulation on broadband providers could “adversely affect broadband/ICT sector investment, with potentially significant secondary costs for the other industries that depend on it and the overall American economy,” the study states.

Authored by Kevin A. Hassett and Robert J. Shapiro, “The Impact of Broadband and Related Information and Communications Technologies on the American Economy” highlights how steady demand for the broadband/ICT sector’s goods and services has helped spur U.S. employment and GDP growth over the past decade. Principal findings of the research include:

• In 2014, the U.S. broadband/ICT sector produced $1,019.2 billion in value added for the American economy, equal to 5.9 percent of U.S. GDP of $17,420.7 billion in 2014. “This substantial share of all U.S. economic value added has been roughly stable for the past decade and likely understates the sector’s full contribution by undervaluing technological improvements,” the paper explains.

• The use of U.S. broadband/ICT goods and services by U.S. private industries, and the information sector (and government), contributed an additional $692.0 billion in output in 2014, equal to 2.7 percent of their combined output and 4.0 percent of GDP. Including the government sector, the use of U.S. broadband/ICT goods and services by other industries and sectors contributed $843.3 billion in output in 2014, equal to 2.9 percent of their combined output and 4.8 percent of GDP.

• The companies that comprise the broadband/ICT sector employed 4,933,000 workers (full-time equivalents or FTE) in 2014, or 4.2 percent of all U.S. private employment and 3.5 percent of all non-farm employment. Demand by the broadband/ICT sector for goods and services produced by other industries was responsible for an additional 2,784,683 jobs (FTE) in 2014. All told, the broadband/ICT sector was responsible for 7,717,683 jobs (FTE) in 2014, or 6.4 percent of all U.S. private employment and 5.5 percent of all non-farm employment.

• The average compensation of broadband/ICT sector workers in 2014 was $104,390, 59.3 percent greater than the average compensation earned by other U.S. workers ($65,517).

“The large economic gains associated with the broadband and ICT sector have flourished in an environment of light federal regulation,” commented Hassett and Shapiro. “The FCC’s proposed regulation of broadband ISPs and their service offerings would stifle broadband/ICT sector investment, growth and employment, negatively impacting the American economy.”

“Today, high-speed Internet is the backbone for 21st century economic growth in the digital economy,” said Rick Boucher, a former Democratic congressman who chaired the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and the Internet and now serves as honorary chairman of the IIA. “Unnecessary price regulation in competitive broadband markets will have far-reaching negative impacts on U.S. economic growth and development. Without ample investment in modern networks, consumers and the entire broadband ecosystem – from Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to edge providers – will suffer from reduced innovation and fewer cutting edge broadband services, as well as reduced jobs and economic growth in the nation’s Internet economy.”

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Wednesday, April 27

Close Competition

By Bruce Mehlman

Our Co-Chairman Bruce Mehlman had a piece published in The Street yesterday highlighting the fact that data collected by the FCC shows special access services are, in fact, highly competitive. An excerpt:

[L]et’s look at the facts. Based on an analysis of the FCC’s own data, it turns out that 25% of buildings that have a connection only to an incumbent local exchange carrier’s (ILEC) special access services are only 17 feet away from the nearest competitive provider’s fiber network; 50% are 88 feet away, and 75% percent are within 456 feet. The mean distance for all relevant buildings is 364 feet.

For comparison, 364 feet is about the length of a football field with the end zones. Seventeen feet? There are canoes and snakes that long. Eighty-eight feet? That’s shorter than an NBA court and less than Yadier Molina throws every night to get a runner out at second base. What about 456 feet? Well, with the Kentucky Derby coming up, that’s more than 200 feet shorter than one furlong. And it’s the same height as a roller coaster in New Jersey.

Check out Mehlman’s full op-ed over at The Street.

Monday, April 18

Boucher on Netflix’s Deception

By Brad

Over at Multichannel News, our own Rick Boucher has written a piece examining Netflix’s admission that it has reduced video speeds for the customers of two wireless providers. An excerpt:

Netflix’s stunning admission that, for five years, it reduced the video speeds of customers of Verizon Wireless and AT&T Wireless — while not doing so for customers of Sprint and T-Mobile — is little short of breathtaking. It was an exercise in hypocrisy to claim that broadband providers were degrading the quality of its video when, in fact, Netflix — without notifying its customers — was doing precisely that.
Recall the history here to understand why Netflix’s actions were so brazen and deserving of governmental review. Traditionally, peering agreements among content networks and last-mile Internet-service providers (ISPs) were never regulated, but were always negotiated between private parties.
For Netflix, arm’s-length negotiations posed a problem, because as the share of total bandwidth taken by its content grew (up to 37% at peak hours, according to one survey in March of 2015), its position became ever more untenable. It wanted ISPs to build more bandwidth to consumers for Netflx’s use, but it didn’t want to help pay for that. It didn’t want its own business model constrained.

You can read Boucher’s full piece, titled “Netflix’s ‘House of Cards’ Collapses,” over at Multichannel News.

Friday, April 08

The Data on Special Access

By Bruce Mehlman

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This week the FCC allowed parties to release some aggregate data in the broadband market collected as part of the ongoing special access proceeding.  And this data, even though partial, confirms what I and others have been saying all along: virtually all businesses have access to real, facilities-based competition today. And to the degree that some individual businesses don’t have that access today, it’s because the current beneficiaries of special access regulation have an incentive not to invest to connect their business customers to the closest competitive fiber networks that are readily available in the market.

In all, 95% of Census blocks where demand for special access exists have competitive facilities available.  And those Census blocks include 99% of all businesses in the country.

With grades like these, let’s give an A+ to the competitive providers that are bringing modern fiber to American businesses.  This definitely includes cable companies that are rapidly expanding their services to businesses of all sizes.

On the other hand, it’s clear from the data that the CLECs have customers in many office buildings that must continue to rely on antiquated copper facilities and their slow data speeds because their CLEC provider refuses to build out fiber connections to nearby fiber networks.  Apparently, it’s easier to call for FCC action than it is to build out networks even 1000 feet to compete with the competitive carriers.

As US Telecom notes, the calls for more FCC intervention are “a matter of convenience, not competition.”  But a business strategy of rent-seeking-rather-than-investing is not evidence of market failure.  It’s evidence instead of regulatory failure.  Because so long as the FCC’s special access policies serve to protect the business models of CLECs, who decline to invest, then why invest?  Why spend shareholders’ or investors’ money when the government forces others to subsidize you?  Nice work if you can get it, but it does nothing to promote innovation or, for that matter, competition.  Government-enabled competition isn’t really competition.

But now that at long last we have some data publicly available, the right policy is even more clear:  There’s simply no reason for the FCC to intervene in this market even more than it already has.  The decision by some companies not to invest in the future should not be a basis for increased regulation.

Tuesday, April 05

Bridging the Homework Gap

By Jamal Simmons

Yesterday, FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel and I traveled to Philadelphia to tour String Theory Charter Schools’ Vine Street Campus (5th grade through 12th grade) and make classroom visits to see the application of modern technology in a next-generation, “Apple Distinguished School” setting.

Commissioner Rosenworcel has championed changes to U.S. Internet and Wi-Fi policies to provide American students greater access to 21st century broadband technologies. She coined the term “Homework Gap” that now commonly refers to the difficulty students experience completing homework when they lack high-speed Internet access at home.

The Homework Gap is real—for one in five kids in our country, it’s a daily struggle that is standing in the way of them reaching their full potential. Affordability is a barrier to high-speed Internet access for low-income families. The FCC’s decision to add broadband to the Lifeline subsidy program last week is a significant step toward closing this digital divide.

According to Pew Research, seven in 10 teachers assign homework that requires Internet access, but five million of the 29 million U.S. households with school-aged children lack regular access to broadband. Unfortunately, a 2015 Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) survey reveals that three in four U.S. school districts report that they are not currently doing anything to address technology access outside of school.

After touring the digital accomplishments of the Vine Street Campus, Commissioner Rosenworcel and Jason Corosanite, Co-Founder & Chief Innovation Officer of String Theory Schools, joined String Theory educators, administrators, parents and local business supporters in a roundtable discussion focused on “Closing the Homework Gap: Technology Lessons Learned in Advancing Education.”  

Commissioner Rosenworcel’s in-depth conversation on the Homework Gap generated thoughtful discussion and innovative ideas in response to the following issues:

• How is technology transforming education?

• Is wireless broadband sufficient for completing homework assignments?

• What are the major barriers to home broadband adoption?

• Are there any federal programs that can help bridge the divide?

• How can the public and private sectors, educators and parents, partner to help close the Homework Gap?

 
“Technology is pervasive in today’s world, and the educational environment should reflect that to keep kids interested and engaged, and enable them to be innovative and productive,” Corosanite stated during the panel discussion. “Rather than taking place in a vacuum, a well-rounded educational approach should train students to perform later in life. Kids without digital skills will fall behind.”
 
Very true. Half of all jobs now require some level of technology skills, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Experts say that number will surpass three-quarters (77%) within the next decade.

Our thanks to Commissioner Rosenworcel and Jason Corosanite for taking part in the discussion. And thanks as well to all the bright students and faculty of String Theory Charter Schools’ Vine Street Campus.

Friday, April 01

IIA Video: Special Access Update

By IIA

A lot has changed since 1996. But one thing that hasn’t changed are so-called “Special Access” regulations. Here’s why the FCC needs to update the rules for today’s technology rather than rely on the regulations of the past.

Thursday, March 31

Statement on the FCC’s Lifeline Actions

By IIA

IIA supports today’s FCC action to make 21st century broadband services accessible and more affordable for our nation’s low-income consumers. For too long, the FCC’s Lifeline program was limited to supporting only voice telephone service. Today’s reforms will not only bring vital broadband Internet service to more Americans, it will also advance administrative efficiencies in the program necessary to attract greater broadband service provider participation and expand competition and choice for eligible consumers. IIA is pleased to have been an active participant in the Lifeline reform process, and we congratulate the Chairman and his fellow Commissioners for their hard work and effort to make the Lifeline program more relevant and useful for low-income Americans in the broadband age.

Tags: fcc, lifeline

IIA Event: Closing the Homework Gap

By IIA

In today’s world, seven in 10 teachers assign homework that requires Internet access, but five million of the 29 million U.S. households with school-aged children lack regular access to broadband. FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel coined the term “Homework Gap” to characterize the divide and shed light on the problem: Kids without broadband are falling behind.

How is technology transforming education? Is wireless broadband sufficient for completing homework assignments? What are the major barriers to home broadband adoption? Are there any federal programs that can help bridge the divide? How can the public and private sectors, educators and parents, partner to help close the Homework Gap?

These are just some of the questions that will be addressed on Monday, April 4 when FCC Commissioner Rosenworcel will join our own Co-Chairman Jamal Simmons for a school tour, classroom visits, and a roundtable discussion at the Philadelphia Performing Arts: A String Theory Charter School.

If you’re in the area and wish to join us, see the details below:

WHAT: School tour, classroom visits, and roundtable discussions with FCC Commissioner Rosenworcel, String Theory Co-Founder & Chief Innovation Officer Jason Corosanite, and IIA Co-Chairman Jamal Simmons

WHEN: Monday, April 4 from 10 am - 12:15 pm ET

WHERE: Philadelphia Performing Arts: A String Theory Charter School, 1600 Vine Street, Philadelphia PA, 19102

For more on the event, check out this story from the Philadelphia Inquirer on FCC Commissioner Rosenworcel’s trip to the city.

Members of the media can RSVP for the event by emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Monday, March 28

Boucher on Internet Privacy Regulations

By Brad

Bloomberg BNA recently published an op-ed from our own Rick Boucher on ensuring the Internet regulatory field remains equal for all parties. You can download a version of the full op-ed in a PDF, but here’s an excerpt:

Privacy in our digital world is once again making headlines, from the controversy over unlocking Apple’s encryption system to the latest breaches of information from e-commerce providers. Lost in all of this discussion—though also illuminated by it—is a tectonic shift in who has access to a user’s electronic data, a change that has profound implications for how privacy should be protected in the future.

Start from a simple point, with which users of digital devices would likely agree: All participants in the Internet economy should extend similar privacy protections to users. That only seems fair. The Internet user’s most important interest, after all, is to have confidence that his or her privacy is being uniformly protected throughout the Internet ecosystem by all entities that have access to users’ information.

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